Clickbait

This is a series I’ve been contemplating for a while. As I collect more material, there will be followup posts. I hope you enjoy it!

Eat six eggs at a time and you'll ALWAYS be beautiful.

Eat six eggs at a time and you’ll ALWAYS be beautiful.

Holding a tiny jellyfish turns you into a MAN'S man.

Holding a tiny jellyfish turns you into a MAN’S man.

Step 1: Buy egg Step 2: Open egg Step 3: Remove $100 from egg and pay mortgage.

Step 1: Buy egg
Step 2: Open egg
Step 3: Remove $100 from egg and pay mortgage.

One is if you wake up with an unexplained oxygen tube in your nose. That's the first tipoff.

One is if you wake up with an unexplained oxygen tube in your nose. That’s the first tipoff.

Tees are rarely used! Same for golf balls!! Who knew!!!

Tees are rarely used!
Same for golf balls!!
Who knew!!!

They sell personalized Honey Boo Boo's. I'd love to see that business model.

They sell personalized Honey Boo Boo’s.
I’d love to see that business model.

If it wasn't secret.  Funny how you knew the date like that.

If it wasn’t secret.
Funny how you knew the date like that.

It almost makes you wonder how they make a profit, those goodhearted capitalists. Heh.

It almost makes you wonder how they make a profit, those goodhearted capitalists.
Heh.

Apostate

Today is a grey day,
A grey and unborn day.
It is a Wednesday, a tired mother,
A day when movement seems meaningless.
Today is a weary and joyless repentance day.
Today we wear down our knees a little more,
Praying the prayer again
That went unanswered on a bleak yesterday.
Today is a day I need forgiveness for.
I break my grey brain against the sky,
Hoping to hatch something besides my thoughts of myself.
Today I hate myself for resenting someone’s happiness.
Today is grey like a mirror-back,
A useless fog-reflection.
The old-man-age of midwinter fumbles at my mind
And coughs on my doorstep.
Today is a day of ash on a forehead.
I return to prayer,
Waiting and soul-sick,
For joy to come of the mourning.

Please remember as you read this: this poem does not necessarily reflect my character or temperament. It is an attempt to capture a certain mood, a certain mind. This is not a good poem, in that it offers nothing for imitation. Think of it as an apostate person remembering the joy of faith. Think of Dostoevsky’s underground man, yearning for peace that he cannot have.

Psalm 148: A Free Verse Rendering

This is a free verse rendering of Psalm 148 I wrote for a poetry class in college. This one needs work, and it’s been called overdone. I present this unfinished version to you all for feedback and criticism. Please comment with thoughts, first impressions, or suggestions.

Praise the Lord from the heavens
Be cosmic bread, leaven of glory,
All seven spheres tune ears to hear what the moon and sun
Have begun to sing in the star-deep sea of the sky.
Let firmaments, assured of enduring,
Remember the commands and decrees
Of the Lord who ceded them their high boundary.
And then tip-top over, to the downward plunge,
Back to the sea, that roaring mirror of the skies;
Leviathan, still unhooked, bows his heads with their fiery eyes; Continue reading

The Economy of Learning, Part 3: A Log on a Deep and Mighty Tide of Incompetence

Any discussion of economics and education would be incomplete without Scripture to back up our thoughts and intuitions. All of Proverbs is written from a father to a son, delivering the wisdom necessary to live a godly, prosperous, long life. “Train up your child in the way he should go, and when he is old, he will not depart from it.” According to Scripture, it is the responsibility of the parent to educate their children. They are to be ready to answer children’s questions (Ex. 12:26, Josh. 4:6-7). Primarily, our children must be taught the fear of the Lord, as evidenced in love and obedience. Or, as Dewey would crudely put it, a “system of morality.” But listen to what Dewey subsitutes for “traditional” morality. “All education which develops power to share effectively in social life is moral.” Recall that social life, although the standard for education, is itself ultimately rootless in its walk “up the future’s endless stair/…Groping, guessing, yet progressing,/ lead us nobody knows where,” as Lewis had it. Other stanzas of the poem are remarkably applicable. In the last examination, Dewey makes education an end unto itself: “…there is nothing to which education is subordinate save more education….the purpose of school education is to insure the continuance of education by organizing the powers that insure growth.” In other words, what we desire is a cancer. Unrestrained growth for its own sake is both rootless, and still deadly in its own inevitable collapse. Dewey sees clearly that education will touch the moral side of a child, shape his character, and even affect his mental disposition and desires. Again, I don’t argue the inevitability of this happening. What I do argue is that when this power of education is surrendered to a decentralized, fascistic state, it will inevitably be both abused by the majority and broken by socialistic egalitarianism.

What does this mean for parents who find themselves unable, insufficiently prepared, or too time-restricted to teach their children? It is then their duty to find themselves some representative who will stand in their stead and deliver a good education to their child. This representative is a teacher. A parent will of course want to hand their child over to someone they trust absolutely to be a good influence on their children: a teacher whose goals are in line with their own. Now, given the sheer volume of diverse goals that parents have for their children (and taking into account the inevitable overlap of basic skills such as reading and writing), is it likely that any one school will match every parent’s desired academic emphases for their children? Not in the least. Thus, a diverse array of schools, teachers, and curricula are necessary to satisfy the public need for education.

But when we flip the picture to see it from the liberal standpoint, we find the teacher is a representative of society. When he is a representative of the individual leaders of families, then it becomes a capitalistic education system, where the individuality and identity of groups within society is maintained, and where the best educators last. Education would no longer be a funnel for public opinion regardless of the individual’s beliefs. But in a socialist state, and the inevitable move towards fascism, education has a duty to fit the child into society, whatever that society is. Dewey worships society by making it the ultimate standard: public education is the bangle on the idol’s wrist. They stand and fall together. From this connection we find ourselves in the schools today teaching against and preventing obesity, teaching our children how the sexual revolution was a good thing, how all religions and cultures are equal (except Christianity and Western culture), and how the world was populated by the savage and beneficent goddess of Evolution. These are not optional: given a view of education where the teacher is a finger of society, preaching the latest fad-gospel is good, righteous, and required. Freedom, as it exists in an independent system of capitalistic education, cannot exist in public education. Dewey’s well-placed and ironic fears have come true.

But not everyone will buy a product completely blind. So how does the Federal government sell their trinket? First, the federal government, since the “No Child Left Behind Act,” has involved itself in setting standards for education that receives funding. The standards have not worked, for they float along with the capabilities of the students like a log on a deep and mighty tide of incompetence. This only makes sense when we take into account that most parents do not necessarily know what it is best for their children to learn, or even have their own goals for their child’s education. We then end up with teachers and schools themselves avowing the benefits of their programs and curricula. But their avowals to the efficacy of their programs depends entirely on their goals for the program, since good intentions cover all. “If we’re teaching the right things and we mean well, then performance matters little,” they think. Our society god accepts our efforts to throw the pinch of incense, however much we stumble. But even the public school system seems to be lacking the power to fulfil their own goals. According to current reviews, America is either at or below the national average in most subjects. Given that our education spending is larger than many countries’ GDP, the results are not worth the spending.

In a capitalistic society, (the only true support for diversity and a heterodonic [a word I made to mean “many-giftedness,” based on 1 Cor. 12] society), we will develop not only better education, but diverse education suited to the desires, capabilities, and opportunities of the individual. On the other hand, a socialist or democratic society, without an ultimate authority, will deliver a stagnant, fruitless education, guaranteed to badly disappoint the needs of most students. It neither fulfils the duties of a suitable representative of Christian parents, nor understands a family-based society. In most of the important ways I can think of, public education, as it has come to look since the early twentieth century, is simply a broken, doomed idea.

The Economy of Learning, Part 2: Gruel Purée All Round

Here is Part 1 of my series on the application of economic principles to the subject of public education.

Now let’s speak plain economics.

What the administrators of public education desire is a monopoly on education. The widespread use of federal funds on the college level shows us just how easy it is to buy into the “free money” system. And what we know is that once a monopoly is established, it tends to be abused. The product may be changed without affecting sales, or the price raised. It’s a way of beating supply and demand. It is fairly certain that no one will be calling for a shrink in the demand of education. Most people agree that children must be taught. So, with no change in demand, and, for the most part, only one supplier, the consumer is between a rock and a bureaucrat. And with education tied to the political fluctuations of the United States, the product is guaranteed to Continue reading

Communion

In the red hymnal, angled sideways on the stacking grey chair,
There were crumbs from last week’s communion.
I look at them.
I think they are the leftovers that filled twelve disciple’s baskets,
Wandered down from Galilee to this small Washington town.
This is the heavenmade bread that will last forever,
Handed down in the hymnal from the greying to the young,
And when we open to page 204,
There is the life-bread of our fathers,
Brown and crusty.
I plant another crumb-crop.

The Economy of Learning, Part 1

THE ECONOMY OF LEARNING:
THE EFFECTS OF SOCIALISM AND CAPITALISM ON EDUCATION

Furthermore, any institution that still stands must, by that very fact, be successful. When we say, as we seem to more and more these days, that education in America is “failing,” it is because we don’t understand the institution. It is, in fact, succeeding enormously. It grows daily, hourly, in power and wealth, and that precisely because of our accusations of failure. – Richard Mitchell, The Graves of Academe

In all the economics readings I did this term, I read broad vistas of discussion, from the rich and undeveloped Third World and how to create wealth there, to the depredations and inroads of socialism into America’s purportedly free economy, to the stereotypical power-mongering of Italian and German despotism. But one topic our class never considered, apart from a brief mention in Liberal Fascism, was the subject of education. And in the book Economics in One Lesson, we learned that economics may broadly be considered as the practice of looking at the long-term effects of any principle, applied to all people involved. If economics is as broad as that, it surely cannot be out of place to examine the effects of various economic theories on education. While this may seem unorthodox, I would wager that this is simply from its novelty rather than its inappropriateness to our discussion. We have, in the course of our class, already ackowledged that wealth is not sheerly a a material thing. It can be increased without adding material: mutually beneficial trade increases wealth without any additional item participating in the the interaction. Knowledge (or wisdom) is the material that education deals in. We pay for it just like any other good, reinvest it, create with it, and leave it to our children as an inheritance, hopefully more of it than we got ourselves: for intents and purposes, we may apply capitalistic principles to education.

In our exploration of this topic Continue reading